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Posts Tagged ‘whole wheat’

 Whole Wheat Pita Bread

Happy New Year everyone! I don’t know about you, but I am starting to feel a little less busy and overwhelmed from the holiday season. I have not been able to find the time to post anything for 2 weeks and I am excited to have the time to share this recipe with you today! Last year I made it my goal to try making home made bread and learn to work with yeast, and I have to say that I proudly met and exceeded that goal. I have come to love working with yeast and the home made breads are just so yummy that it is hard to think about buying many breads from the store anymore. That especially goes for pita after I made this recipe! This pita bread was amazingly delicious. It was so soft and fluffy and went perfectly with humus. My version didn’t make pita pockets, and I am not sure what the trick is to make them. After making this pita bread, I can honestly say that I will never buy store bought pita again. Store bought pita is like card board compared to this wonderfully fluffy version. Both of my girls absolutely love it as well and it makes a perfect snack. It is also whole wheat which can help with any of you starting your New Year’s resolutions! 🙂

Whole Wheat Pita Bread
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Ingredients:
2¼ tsp. instant yeast
1 tbsp. honey
1¼ cups warm water (105˚-115˚ F), divided
1½ cups bread flour, divided
1½ cups whole wheat flour, divided
¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
1 tsp. salt
Cornmeal, for sprinkling

Directions:
In the bowl of a stand mixer*, combine the yeast, honey and ½ cup of the water.  Stir gently to blend.  Whisk ¼ cup of the bread flour and ¼ cup of the whole wheat flour into the yeast mixture until smooth.  Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and set aside until doubled in bulk and bubbly, about 45 minutes.

Remove the plastic wrap and return the bowl to the mixer stand, fitted with the dough hook.  Add in the remaining ¾ cup of warm water, 1¼ cups bread flour, 1¼ cups whole wheat flour, olive oil and salt.  Knead on low speed until the dough is smooth and elastic, about 8 minutes.  Transfer the ball of dough to a lightly oiled bowl, turning once to coat, and let rise in a warm draft-free place, about 1 hour, until doubled in bulk.

Place an oven rack in the middle position.  Place a baking stone in the oven (if using) and preheat to 500˚ F.

Once the dough has risen, transfer to a lightly floured work surface, punch down the dough and divide into 8 equal pieces.  Form each piece into a ball.  Flatten one ball at a time into a disk, then stretch out into a 6½-7 inch circle.  Transfer the rounds to a baking sheet or other work surface lightly sprinkled with cornmeal.  Once all the rounds have been shaped, loosely cover with clean kitchen towels.  Let stand at room temperature for 30 minutes, until slightly puffy.

Transfer 4 pitas, 1 at a time, onto the baking surface.  (Note: These can be baked on a baking stone or directly on the oven racks.  I use a pizza stone, but either method is fine.) Bake 2 minutes, until puffed and pale golden.  Gently flip the pitas over using tongs and bake 1 minute more.  Transfer to a cooling rack and let cool completely.  Repeat with the remaining pitas.  Store in an airtight container for up to 3 days.

*As always, anything mixed in a stand mixer can be mixed by hand.

Adapted From: Annie’s Eats

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Whole Wheat Bread

Wheat BreadMaking homemade Wheat Bread has been on my kitchen “bucket-list” for quite awhile now and since it finally started to get cooler I decided to give it a go. This recipe has quite a few ingredients, but the flavor is perfect. It has a very light wheat flavor and the honey gives it a nice sweetness. For my first ever batch of homemade bread it turned out wonderfully!  The dough was simple to make and it was also easy to work with and shape. Overall this was an easy recipe and I look forward to making it again. Next time I am going to try to measure the flours by weight and see if it does anything to the density of the bread. The recipe makes two loaves, so we have one out for now and we froze the other one to use as needed.

Whole-Wheat Bread with Wheat Germ and Rye
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Makes two 9-inch loaves.

2-1/3 cups warm water (about 100 degrees)
1½ tablespoons instant yeast
¼ cup honey
4 tablespoons (½ stick) unsalted butter, melted
2½ teaspoons salt
¼ cup (7/8 ounce) rye flour
½ cup toasted wheat germ
3 cups (16½ ounces) whole-wheat flour
2¾ cups (13¾ ounces) unbleached all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting the work surface

1. In the bowl of a standing mixer, mix the water, yeast, honey, butter, and salt with a rubber spatula. Mix in the rye flour, wheat germ, and 1 cup each of the whole-wheat and all-purpose flours.

2. Add the remaining whole-wheat and all-purpose flours, attach the dough hook, and knead at low speed until the dough is smooth and elastic, about 8 minutes. Transfer the dough to a lightly floured work surface. Knead just long enough to make sure that the dough is soft and smooth, about 30 seconds.

3. Place the dough in a very lightly oiled large bowl; cover with plastic wrap. Let rise in a warm, draft-free area until the dough has doubled in volume, about 1 hour.

4. Heat the oven to 375 degrees. Gently press down the dough and divide into two equal pieces. Gently press each piece into a rectangle about 1 inch thick and no longer than 9 inches. With a long side of the dough facing you, roll the dough firmly into a cylinder, pressing down to make sure that the dough sticks to itself. Turn the dough seam-side up and pinch it closed. Place each cylinder of dough in a greased 9 by 5-inch loaf pan, seam-side down and pressing the dough gently so it touches all four sides of the pan. Cover the shaped dough; let rise until almost doubled in volume, 20 to 30 minutes.

5. Bake until an instant-read thermometer inserted at an angle from the short end just above the pan rim reads 205 degrees, 35 to 45 minutes. Transfer the bread immediately from the baking pans to wire racks; cool to room temperature.

Adapted from Annie’s-Eats, originally from Baking Illustrated.

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